The Union – Recap

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Posted by Greg on April 22, 2011 at 9:46 pm
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Elton John and Martin Scorsese

The Union debuted Wednesday night at the 10th annual Tribeca Film Festival. It sounds like the free, outdoor event went off without a hitch and the weather cooperated as well. More than 5,000 people watched the documentary which included opening comments from Elton John, Martin Scorsese and video messages from both Leon Russell and Cameron (along with the rest of the cast, crew and animals on the set of We Bought a Zoo).


Cast & Crew Video Intro

After the screening, Elton performed some of his biggest hits and a few songs from The Union as well. The entire set list was as follows: “Tiny Dancer”, “Rocket Man”, “Gone to Shiloh”, “You’re Never Too Old (To Hold Somebody)”, “I Guess That’s Why They Call it the Blues” and “Your Song”. Here’s a video snippet recapping the evening from Euro News:

Lastly, Here’s a few of the relevant quotes from the evening’s festivities. You can also read stories about the event over at the Hollywood Reporter or USA Today,

“For me, movies and music have been inseparable. They always have been and always will be,” said Scorsese. “And I know that the same holds true for Cameron Crowe. I have to say that I’ve always been kind of envious of Cameron’s teenage years. Because about a half a century ago when I was young. People always had a fantasy about running away with the circus or running away with the carnival. This was never seemed that appealing to me because I saw the film version of Nightmare Alley and it really wasn’t really my thing. But Cameron ran away with the band when he was a teenager. And his connection to the music is there in every frame of every film he has ever made. From Say Anything… to Almost Famous to the wonderful picture you are going to see here tonight, The Union – Martin Scorsese

“With Cameron (filming) was very uninvasive. You don’t notice him after awhile. He’s got a knack for appearing behind plants and things like that.” – Elton John

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