Crowe’s Nest: Gossard Cameo, PJ Roots, Vedder, Citizen Dick

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Posted by Greg on July 18, 2011 at 7:51 am
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Stone Gossard and the “Waiting for the Interurban” statue

The Crowe’s Nest is a feature that collects random tidbits, etc. in one blog post. Today’s edition focuses on PJ related items:

  • Like many other places, Washington State/Seattle is having major financial problems. It doesn’t look like they will be attracting any new film and TV productions anytime soon as they have cut all tax incentives. This article talks about Seattle’s film legacy and includs a great picture (above) of Pearl Jam’s Stone Gossard (who was part of Mother Love Bone at the time) on the set of Say Anything… (in a scene that was cut from the final film).
  • The Seattle Times looks back at Pearl Jam’s 20 years with a strong focus on their local roots. There’s some great anecdotes (especially around Eddie Vedder “helping out”), so you’ll want to check it out.
  • The San Diego Union Tribune talks with Eddie Vedder during his recent Ukelele tour. Topics include early influences like Pete Townshend and Neil Young, along with the upcoming PJ20. Here’s what Eddie had to say about looking back:

“I think that, in order to keep progressing, there should be some benefits to looking back, to help you determine what your future course may be. But if they are (there), I don’t think they’ve been tangible for any of us… What we’ve learned is that we really do live in the present. And, to be honest, this looking back thing make me feel like I’m glad we have someone as astute and devoted to music as Cameron Crowe at the helm of putting something together that would represent us and tell a certain number of stories that happened over (the past) 20 years.. So I think we’re just happy we’ve survived it and are still friends and more than that, happy that we’re still a working group.

  • Finally, a great quote about Singles and Citizen Dick by former OK Hotel booker/Gits drummer Steve Moriarty for Mark Yarm’s upcoming book, Everybody Loves Our Town: An Oral History of Grunge, which will be released on Sept. 6, 2011.
“I remember seeing fake posters on the poles for a show that the band in [Singles] was supposed to be playing. They’d filmed them, then left the posters up. We were like, ‘Is that show really going on at the OK Hotel? I don’t remember booking that.’ I was like, ‘Who the fuck are Citizen Dick?’”

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