PSH

123 Comments
Posted by Cameron on February 3, 2014 at 4:59 am
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My original take on this scene was a loud, late night pronouncement from Lester Bangs.  A call to arms.  In Phil’s hands it became something different.  A scene about quiet truths shared between two guys, both at the crossroads, both hurting, and both up too late.  It became the soul of the movie.  In between takes, Hoffman spoke to no one.  He listened only to his headset, only to the words of Lester himself.  (His Walkman was filled with rare Lester interviews.) When the scene was over, I realized that Hoffman had pulled off a magic trick.  He’d leapt over the words and the script, and gone hunting for the soul and compassion of the private Lester, the one only a few of us had ever met.  Suddenly the portrait was complete. The crew and I will always be grateful for that front row seat to his genius.

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123 Comments

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:12 pm Kirsten said

    Lovely.

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:16 pm Amy Knopf via Facebook said

    seriously good actor and seriously missed.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:19 pm Kim Sloan via Facebook said

    I posted this scene yesterday too. My heart is heavy and sad for the loss of PSH. He was amazeballs!

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:19 pm Melinda Gilb said

    Awesome movie, awesome performance….sad day for PSH fans.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:19 pm Kim Alexander via Facebook said

    Sam Alexander

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:20 pm Francine Sarah via Facebook said

    Michael Buso

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:21 pm Ron Alcazar via Facebook said

    Thanks for being Lester Bangs… and uncool!!! You are already missed, Mr. Hoffman :(

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  • He was so great in that movie. This piece is a very nice tribute to him, Cameron.

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  • My favorite roll of his by far. Nice insight into him playing Lester Bangs

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  • Tragic loss man…

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  • I posted this yesterday

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  • Daniel Niska Josh Patrice

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:24 pm Daniel Johnson said

    Thanks for this Cameron! Me and my friends quote those lines all the time. It’s great to read your insight on how it came together! RIP Philip!

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:24 pm Daniela Oliveira said

    Still my favorite movie..PSH was a true artist.

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  • Oh my… I wish that I would have met him. I wish that someone could have saved him from the demons in his head. How sad. I wish that I could have met him and made him laugh…

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  • Brilliant Actor! Sadly, he caved and gave it a whirl again – LOVE

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  • … Cameron you are brilliant…
    and your words are so kind…
    Love, Lorelei

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:27 pm Julie Poirier via Facebook said

    What is shared with the uncool…..my favorite.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:28 pm Marjorie Lewis said

    This was the scene I posted all over facebook yesterday. There are very few (perhaps no others) that you can honestly say the following about: “He is ALWAYS my FAVORITE part of EVERY movie he is in!” But in this case, was my favorite part of my favorite movie. Thank you for sharing. #RIPPSH

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  • I loved his portrayal of Lester Bangs in this wonderful movie. Truly a great actor of our time- he should have been acting, produing and directing forever- like Eastwood. RIP Philip.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:28 pm Stacy Heatherington via Facebook said

    What a talented and gifted artist. I will miss him. Always looked forward to his next project. May he be at peace. Hearts and thoughts.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:29 pm Indra said

    When I heard PSH had overdosed on drugs, his scenes in this film came back to me – so prophetic–so tragic –a terrible, terrible loss. He was such a nuanced actor. My deepest sympathies to his friends, family and loved ones.

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:29 pm Joseph said

    I loved also that story of Philip commenting on a voice he heard when filming the scene of Lester introduced to William on the street, as if Lester was haunting the shoot that day, giving Philip notes–as if Philip was the worthy vessel. He was one of the great vessels.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:30 pm Manuel Mercado Grima via Facebook said

    i luv this film

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:33 pm David T Mesko via Facebook said

    Great Tribute!

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:35 pm Paul Simon via Facebook said

    This was my go-to yesterday, as well. I knew I’d “like” the film but that invested me. Thank you for bringing it to us, CC, and sorry for such a loss to those close.

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:35 pm Rhiannon Irving said

    While every individual performance in AF is sprinkled with the magic that makes it the amazing movie that it is, it’s always PSH’s performance as Lester Bangs I gravitate back to. He makes being an ‘uncool’ music loving (& living) person seem completely ok.

    Some of that, for sure, is the essence of both the script & direction as well as some of Lester himself, but a chunk must undoubtedly be credited to the part of Philip that truly understood that feeling right from deep within himself. In the stereotypical sense he was ‘uncool’ but ultimately he knew that ‘cool’ was what you made of it and his exceptional talent made him so very, very cool.

    My thoughts go out to all his friends & family. We have lost an exceptional man

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:37 pm Vanessa Meier via Facebook said

    Just this past Friday nite I was watching “Almost Famous” (my all-time favorite movie) for the eleventy-billionth time and I was really enjoying his performance and thinking about how he totally ABSORBS his characters. And then I just couldn’t believe this news yesterday. Such a treasure. So sorry for your loss, Cameron. (((hugs)))

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:38 pm Eric Silver said

    No scene in any film before or since moves me like the phone call with William Miller and Lester Bangs. I have adopted, if imperfectly, “The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone else when we’re uncool”, as my guiding light. I only let the uncool get close to me. I loved Phil Hoffman for all he gave us. He humanized characters others saw as aberrant or derelict. I wept off and on yesterday like I never have for someone I never met. Today, I’m heartbroken for Phil’s family and friends and for all the greatness he left us and all the greatness he never will be able to share.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:39 pm Lisa said

    It’s one of my favorite scenes of all movies, let alone Almost Famous. Thanks for sharing your memory.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:39 pm Jeff Wexler said

    I remember every one of the scenes with Philip Seymour Hoffman and they all had a sort of magic that of course I attributed to Cameron’s brilliant writing. The dialog for Lester Bangs, the character, truly the soul of the movie as Cameron says, was brilliant, but I had no idea that Cameron had in mind possibly quite different performances. Phil’s performance proved the value of the words as written on the page but took it to a magical place. Cameron’s generosity, patience and respect for actors is wonderful thing, giving to us all, to the movie, characters with a heart and soul that transcends the words, surprising us with every scene.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:43 pm Ron Alcazar via Facebook said

    “The only true currency in this bankrupt world is what you share with someone else when you’re uncool.”
    -Philip Seymour Hoffman, Lester Bangs

    Reply

  • heart broken :(

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:59 pm Rick Casebeer said

    I immediately thought about that scene when I heard about his death and I remember thinking how he was able to convey his loneliness in that scene…I hope that wasn’t the the case as he sat in his apartment, contemplating where he’d been and where he was going.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 1:59 pm Shandra Cosgriff via Facebook said

    This was one of my favorite scenes in a movie ever! He nailed it

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  • This is the same scene I posted yesterday (on my fb page) after I heard what happened. I always felt this was not acting, but his soul projecting through in this scene…..part of why I loved him so. My favorite actor, and my favorite movie. I am greiving…..I will miss him </3

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  • This is the same scene I posted yesterday (on my fb page) after I heard what happened. I always felt this was not acting, but his soul projecting through in this scene…..part of why I loved him so. My favorite actor, and my favorite movie. I am greiving…..I will miss him </3

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 2:11 pm Catherine Platt via Facebook said

    <3

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 2:11 pm Catherine Platt via Facebook said

    <3

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 2:16 pm Panta Rei via Facebook said

    I posted it yesterday too…I felt the same debe

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 2:16 pm Panta Rei via Facebook said

    I posted it yesterday too…I felt the same debe

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  • One of my favorite roles every

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  • One of my favorite roles every

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  • Loved Phil in this role…He just owned it!!

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 2:33 pm Janice Roland Wilke said

    Thankyou…….much needed focus on this today.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 2:34 pm Chris McQueen said

    Lovely. Philip Seymour Hoffman, rest easy.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 2:44 pm ana maria said

    cameron thank you for always giving us the right words, especially in this time.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 2:49 pm Jenn Keating via Facebook said

    Love this.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:01 pm Sandra said

    It’s true genius when you no longer think you are watching a scripted film, but feel you are looking in their window and watching someone bare their soul….gone way too soon.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:11 pm Jimmy said

    Philip Seymour Hoffman was the best thing in just about every movie he was in. He would have been the best thing in a lot more movies.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:15 pm Clint Corey via Facebook said

    My favorite film and my favorite actor. He will definitely be missed and looking forward to reading this.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:21 pm Sandy Benton via Facebook said

    He was so perfect for this role. What a tragedy.

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  • Loved him as Lester Bangs

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:30 pm Daniela Rosanna Veas Vega via Facebook said

    Me too! Such a great loss, I can’t believe it :(

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  • Autumn you should see this, if you haven’t already. :-(

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:40 pm Kathy Miller said

    Lester Bangs was my best friend from 1972 until his death. I met him via letters and then had those late night telephone calls with him before he moved to New York City, where I live. He encouraged me to write, and was a solid editor (even though we were friends.) When I heard that there was going to be a filmed enactment of Lester I was very skeptical. But I elected to hold judgement until I saw what was filmed. What I saw was Philip Seymour Hoffman bring my friend back to life. He captured those late night telephone calls. Lester’s integrity, his good humor, and his code. It was sad and sweet for me as Philip truly captured his essence. Goodbye Philip, safe passage to the other side. Kathy Miller

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:41 pm Candice Lopez via Facebook said

    Tears. PSH is and will always be remembered as a true artist. One who’s art will always last!

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:52 pm Karen Oakes via Facebook said

    Sooooo Sad…………..

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:54 pm Carly Ranger via Facebook said

    Paul xx

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 3:59 pm Inês Cereja said

    I love this film and I love Hoffman. He did an amazing job portraying Lester Bangs and I can truly say both the film and his performance influenced my life. I was very young when the film first came out (nine years old) and it completely changed my perspective on music and it made me start doing the thing I love the most: writing.

    Thank you for that Cameron. And thank you Philip for bringing it to life.

    Inês Cereja

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:03 pm Azura Fidya Erizal via Facebook said

    This scene was the first thing I remember when I heard about the news

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:03 pm Heather Anderson Ede via Facebook said

    I adored Phillip Seymour Hoffman in Almost Famous. He was a brilliant actor and I was shocked and devastated to learn of his passing yesterday. I don’t know what else to say, other than the world lost one of its’ greats yesterday. And “Don’t do drugs”.

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:05 pm Inês Cereja via Facebook said

    I love this film and I love Hoffman. He did an amazing job portraying Lester Bangs and I can truly say both the film and his performance influenced my life. I was very young when the film first came out (nine years old) and it completely changed my perspective on music and it made me start doing the thing I love the most: writing.

    Thank you for that Cameron. And thank you Philip for bringing it to life.

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:17 pm Howard Solow said

    My favorite scene is the earlier scene when he declares that rockn roll is dead and that silence is more compelling than todays music. Ive often thought that scene was ironic since ther was so much great music that came out of the early to mid 70’s.Perfect sentiment for the 80’s.My other favorite rolls are Brandt in Big Lebowski,short as it was and the cia agent ic Charlie Wilson’s war.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:22 pm David Reid said

    I have always thought that PSH’s role as Lester Bangs was a definitive role for him in an absolute gem of a film. He was a delight to watch on screen; sorry I never saw him onstage.

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  • Cameron, how do we get some kind of theatrical release for the director’s cut, which has more of Hoffman and so many other wonderful scenes that most have yet to see?

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:27 pm Jenn Kelly said

    Thank you.

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:40 pm Tim Couillard via Facebook said

    Lester Bangs: You’ll meet them all again on their long journey to the middle.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:45 pm Miles Mogulescu said

    Thanks so much for sharing this.
    Even though I’m one degree of separation from Phil–I know people who knew him but never actually met him myself–I feel like I’ve lost a member of my family. For my take on the loss of Phil in the Huffington Post see: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/miles-mogulescu/philip-seymour-hoffman-death_b_4718636.html

    Reply

  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:48 pm Jonny Chu via Facebook said

    Wow.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:49 pm Mike Mountain via Facebook said

    R.I.P. Phil.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:49 pm R. Tim Morris said

    Cameron, you were lucky to get PSH when you did. A masterful role by a masterful artist. It’s a shame you’ll never get to cast him again.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 4:51 pm Mariana Garcia via Facebook said

    <3

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 5:21 pm Diane Medina via Facebook said

    Great scene. I read your piece on Bangs in the San Diego Reader back in 2000. PSH knocked it out of the park with this role despite how small it was. “We are uncool.”

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 5:34 pm Sarah said

    I’m truly bummed we lost a rare human being that portrayed it on screen. I don’t think film will be the same for a long time to come.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 5:43 pm Russell Hammond said

    This portrayal changed my life. It taught me that it was ok to blaze your own trail and not to get caught up in things I can’t control. I’ll never forget PSH

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 6:16 pm Larry Brooks said

    When I first saw your movie, This was the scene I most identified with and it right into me. It’s still one of my favorite all-time scenes – thank you, Cameron, for writing it, and thank you for casting Philip, and providing us with this rare, rare gift in film – something we can really take home with us & return to time and again. Beyond my great sadness that Philip is gone, I feel depressed that there will be no more new Philip Seymore Hoffman appearances in movies, theater, or TV. He had scores and scores of roles yet to play – and we now we’ll never have the wonderful experience of seeing him in anything new again. I extend my sincere sympathy to his family and friends.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 6:30 pm Bob Burroughs said

    Cameron, I started reading your work in magazines and album covers long ago in what now seems a different world. It was ALWAYS moving to me. I knew it mattered to you.
    I first learned of PSH in Almost Famous, of which I have watched too many times to count. You captured that era so perfectly. And the performances remain perfect to me. Lester was a true one in a billion. And Phil nailed it.
    Thank you for your art, your heart, and dedication to the truth. Like so many I thank you for introducing me to a very talented man and share the heartache knowing he has left us. And the grief for his family and children, it’s all too much,
    Bob in Florida

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 6:40 pm Chris Mathison said

    When I read the news yesterday, I did shed some tears. Phillip Seymour Hoffman was an incredibly talented actor and have never been disappointed with any roles he’s played. My favorite role of his is as Lester Bangs in my very favorite Rock movie ever, Almost Famous. Even though he apparently had been suffering from the flu for the reported 3 days he was on set, he turned in a more than exemplary performance. You will truly be missed Phillip.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 6:53 pm Carly Ranger via Facebook said

    Dalip – I thought I’d share this with you. Cameron Crowe on PSH for his role as ‘Lester Bangs’ in ‘Almost Famous’. Gone too soon. – Carly :-)

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  • very good actor .

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  • Will be missed for sure.

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  • Unique. But that’s not a good enough word

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  • Irreplaceable

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 8:10 pm Lefteris Beck via Facebook said

    He was such an amazing and talented actor. RIP, Mr. Philip Seymour Hoffman.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 8:53 pm Rachel said

    This movie is my all-time fav with THE best soundtrack to acv ompany any movie. I was blown away by every actor in it. Hoffman will always be steadfast in my <3 when I watch it. Peace.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 9:00 pm V. said

    This has always been one of my favorite scenes in any film. You could feel the truth of it coming from PSH’s soul.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 9:14 pm Terry Anderson via Facebook said

    So little gained; too much lost; wish the day would come; life is too short to throw it away; going, gone, no more light; and when the day comes, no more wishing.

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  • I posted this scene last night on my page. I think this scene speaks to the appeal he had to all of The Uncool in all of us. So sad. He will be truly missed.

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  • On February 3, 2014 at 10:35 pm Kate Barnett via Facebook said

    This scene resonates with me in a way a cannot describe.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 12:58 am Ida Tavakoli said

    my favorite scene from my favorite movie by my favorite actor. nothing is more magical. rip. and thank you cameron crowe for the movie that will always be closest to my heart. i appreciate you sharing this with us, seriously beautiful.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 5:31 am Yaseen Overlee said

    “You wanna be a true friend to them? Be honest, and unmerciful.” Your true friend is the one who tell you what you do not want to hear. This whole thing is very sad. You want to reach out and take his pudgy thick fingers and lead him away from that wretchedness and sadness and hopelessness he lead himself too. We who have the experience with addiction need to speak out to the youth who are switching from prescription pain killers to shooting dope. And these inexperienced young fools think that the size of the bag is what matters, because they do not understand the nature of Heroin. The head of a straight pin is enough sniffed of pure Heroin to send you reeling. And the sad truth is people will hear the name of the brand on those glassine baggies, “Ace Of Hearts and Ace of Spades” and be out searching for it to satisfy there craving. ” “Aces and Eights” = a “Dead Man’s Hand.” ask Wild Bill. In the Barrio of Spanish Harlem, “DOA’ and “Tombstone’ were top sellers in the 90’s. Imagine that for your wake up at the local Starbucks. “Tango and Cash” another brand was killing people all over NYC, and fiends were frantically searching out this label. We have an epidemic on our hands.”You wanna be a true friend to them? Be honest, and unmerciful.” That will actually be the greatest mercy you could show.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 8:10 am Lauren said

    Thank-you Cameron. This is especially healing for those of us who will not have the opportunity to work with him, and had so desired to.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 8:42 am Andrew said

    This was the first film I thought of when I heard the news about Philip Seymour Hoffman. At first, when he started getting a lot of roles, I was wondering, “come on, already–is this another actor we’re going to start seeing in every SINGLE movie, now?” I think that his performance of the smug, smirking, effortlessly socially unerring Ivy Leaguer in “The Talented Mr. Ripley” convinced me that he WAS that obnoxious character.

    Then “Almost Famous” came out, and with my mouth hanging open, I thought: “all right–so THIS is why we need to see him in every single movie.” I’ve been ashamed ever since of having criticized him in the first place. The range he had. Who else could have played so many diverse characters, so convincingly? For me, this is still his greatest role. I don’t know how any actor could manage to stand out, among all the other fantastic performances in “Almost Famous,” but he did. Well done, Mr. Hoffman.

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  • Hoffman shows us that there is more to a scene than words. This was his gift. He will be missed.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 9:35 am Melissa Smith via Facebook said

    Such an extraordinary talent! We love you, Phillip!

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  • thank you for this and thank you for the films you’ve made, especially for Almost Famous and you’re right, this scene is the soul of that movie. I saw it all those years ago when I was in my 20s and now I’m in my late 30s I see even clearer how absolutely true everything Lester says is. So simple and so true. And you know, this can be applied to women too. The uncool and smart women. Men are always a problem for us and the only true currency in this bankrupt world is what we share with someone else when we’re uncool.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 12:53 pm Jonathan said

    My favorite movie mainly because of PSH’s portrayal of Lester Bangs. The quotes are the most memorable and he pulled it off like no one other could. When I think of actors who are my age and are great, he is the first one who comes to mind. Disappointed we won’t get to experience his talent further.

    “You’ll meet them all again on the long journey to the middle.”

    – Philip Seymour Hoffman as Lester Bangs

    Reply

  • On February 4, 2014 at 1:36 pm Susan Edrington via Facebook said

    He was so wonderful as Lester. Who would have known they would leave this earth in a similar fashion? He was one of my favorite actors. After watching videos last night of him, he was a kind and caring man — just battling demons like we all do. Bless his heart. We will miss you Phil Hoffman.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 1:38 pm Susan Edrington via Facebook said

    By the way, I don’t think tough love is actually a great way to treat an addict. I think if Mimi would have really cared and cared about the father of her children, she would have gotten him help. She seems a bit heartless to me.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 1:40 pm valerio said

    Thanks for this magic moment

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  • a call to arms became classic introspective reverence. fucking awesome.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 6:37 pm Desiree Krueger via Facebook said

    I really enjoyed the characters he played, and so well…..just recently watched “The Last Quartet” and well, he will be missed….much love to his friends and family, his kids, and to us all…..

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 6:44 pm Desiree Krueger via Facebook said

    Was a great scene, btw….

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 8:20 pm DMiller said

    We knew him as Phil. Sometimes Phil Hoffman, but mostly just Phil. He was the kid goofing off in the back of the class, trying to make everyone laugh. He was the guy on your baseball or football team you were always trying to catch up to or be around. You wanted to be his friend, and he made that easy. Phil was “cool” but he would never have said that.
    Losing Philip Seymour Hoffman hurts.
    Losing Phil hurts a little more.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 8:47 pm Shelly Karasony via Facebook said

    So sad….

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 9:52 pm Emma Rose Mailey said

    I absolutely love this. Philip Seymour Hoffman’s passing is a devastating loss for those who admired his work, and I’m sure even more so to those who knew and loved him.

    The hunger to keep searching for the truth of something–in art and in life–is where I believe the true brilliance of a person lies. The way you described how he was able to uncover a side of Lester Bangs, usually kept hidden under one of the carefully constructed masks we all wear, was inspiring. In doing so he captured not just the essence, but as you say, the soul of Lester and brought that to life in one of my favorite performances of all time in my favorite movie of all time.

    So I just wanted to thank you for sharing your time with him, with us. I think you are an incredible talent, and seem to be an equally, genuinely, incredible person.

    Thanks for making it so cool to be Uncool.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 10:49 pm Czyka Tumaliuan said

    This is ineffably beautiful. PSH is indeed an actor of depth.

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  • On February 4, 2014 at 11:35 pm christine lavin said

    The only film I like better than the commercial release “Almost Famous” is the director’s cut. I’ve thought of you, Cameron, when I’ve seen other music films ineptly handled — I always wonder what they could have been in YOUR hands.

    Lester Bangs is such an indelible character — I remember that goofy solo dance move he does in the radio station. It was maybe two or three seconds on the screen, yet so memorable: passionate, unselfconscious, and yes, uncool.

    Thank you for making a film that will stand the test of time, will still be here when the rest of us are dust.

    Reply

    • On February 5, 2014 at 8:58 am Andrew said

      Yes! The dance he does as Lester Bangs when he makes the DJ put on Iggy Pop. That is the one thing that absolutely makes the performance for me. I never knew Lester Bangs, but somehow I felt certain that that portrayed him perfectly.

      Reply

  • On February 6, 2014 at 6:33 am Joe Seijo said

    What amazes me is the over-the-top, ridiculous coverage and attention that Paul Walker’s death received by the news outlets and the mindless general public, yet, thankfully, choose not to do the same for PSH who was a thousand times more talented than Paul Walker ever was.

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  • On February 8, 2014 at 10:42 am Anton said

    Its characters like these that truly showed who Hoffman was. Lonely, but strong. I will always find inspiration in his characters; honest depictions of out-liars and losers, cant help but touch those qualities in all of us. RIP Mr. Hoffman. Im truly sorry your disease got the better of you in the end…

    Reply

  • On February 9, 2014 at 10:16 am Gerri Curless said

    Watching this movie for the 3rd time – loving it all.

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  • On February 12, 2014 at 8:38 am Josh Polak said

    Dear Mr. Crowe,

    About ten years ago, I was so awestruck as a moviegoer that I was inspired to sit down and write two honest-to-goodness fan letters as a small way to show my admiration.

    The first one was for Philip Seymour Hoffman. I had just re-watched Punch Drunk Love and was just so utterly amazed at how perfect his performance was. No hyperbole. He was just THAT goddamn good, and it got me thinking of how he was basically perfect in EVERY role he was in.

    But I was lazy. I never sent the letter. And when I read the tragic news that he was gone forever, the first thing that crossed my mind was that I never sent that letter. And I know that most likely, that letter would have been tossed in a pile or thrown away by his agent, but there was always that small chance that he would have read it and known that some nameless faceless movie fan loved the hell out of his work. But now there’s zero chance. I hate that he’s gone and I hate that I was too lazy to send that insignificant letter.

    The second letter I wrote was for you. And I didn’t send that one either. But I don’t want to lose my chance like I did with Mr. Hoffman.

    So all I wanted to say was “thank you.” Your words, your images, your indescribable appreciation for music….all of these things have profoundly enhanced and enriched my life. Singles. Almost Famous. Jerry Maguire. Vanilla Sky. Say Anything. (parts of) Elizabethtown. Pearl Jam Twenty. Your work has touched me more than my words can really convey.

    I don’t know if you’ll ever read this or if one more fan’s praise could possibly make any difference at this point, but I’m not going to lose my chance to at least tell you. Thank you so much. You’re amazing and I appreciate what you do.

    Sincerely,

    Josh Polak

    Reply

  • On March 11, 2014 at 5:45 pm Julie A. Eppers said

    Since poetry is pretty uncool… I wanted to share this poem I wrote in memory of PSH. Thank you, Cameron Crowe.

    The Giving In
    (for PSH)

    I wonder now – blessed with brilliance and this unsettling ability to see – how the anguish and agony could overtake me with such forbidden passion. I shed my armor years ago, consciously deciding to stand face forward in the world, exclusive of everything else. Myself and my self… that is all I have. I shed the armor… laid it down and walked away. I glanced back once, quickly, over my shoulder, but the allure was gone. There was nothing there I needed anymore. I was already naked in ways I had not been since rebirth; but I felt clothed in confidence and walked on.

    Looking back, my self-absorbed obsession for being someone else had gotten me quite far, at least in the eyes of others. I am now a spectacle, a marvel to behold, and they stare at me and watch me eat, stalking me through city streets and coffee houses, where all I want to do is drink a simple tea and close my mind. I am always on, to them. I am always the only “me” they see, and I am tired of the inability to pass along beside them, any of them, quietly… unnoticed. Not a likely providence for me. Anymore.

    And now… oh, the things they will say now. How so many of them will mourn the loss of my insipid “gift”. False tears falling from eyes swollen with longing for something they cannot contain; no sense of how consuming the world can be once you feed it from your soul. It becomes a greedy savage, ravaging the once private lives, claiming them as fair game, scavenging for tidbits in sullen, blurry photographs hastily snapped before the moment passed. Quickly gone are they… giggling into each other’s shoulders, full of self-satisfaction for having breached that invisible wall to approach me. A person. Just a man, seeking a sip of tea and a tiny snack of solitude. If they had but spent one quarter of the time talking to the silent man in 15 coats at the end of the block, their impact would have been profound.

    Anxiety perplexes me. Even on my own, here, in this suspended fortress of a home I stutter as I try to say the lines I wrote myself. In someone else’s words, the world sings from my lips. In my own, a faulty stutter sputters forth, and I find my words as jumbled as my thoughts… the dull confused sensation of screaming underwater. What is the point?
    There is no point. These days.

    I am taunting my obsession, having a taste. The longing overtook me months ago; I am helpless still. Well, not helpless, but not willing to test my strength right now. I feel I have earned the giving in, the letting down, the leaving it all on the table. Hence, the armor, shed. All I want to do is collapse among too many pillows on this too big couch in this monotonous apartment and stare at the art, imagining what it would say if it could sing. I have earned this giving in. Perched here in the darkness, even in the darkness, they surround me. Wanting a piece of something that I have, as if touching me in any way would matter. I close my eyes, then, still focused on the artwork in my mind… still hearing subtle music… as I feel the rush of cool run through me. The calm comes instantly… and I feel my lips become a smile… as I sink even further into the pillows… and the art hums quietly… as the hollow world is rushed away… readily replaced by this inexplicable nirvana… that I want to never end. I could die here… in this moment of unbearable perfection… and leave this world encased in joy. I have earned this giving in. I make this day mine.

    ~ Julie A. Eppers

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    • On March 12, 2014 at 2:41 pm MARK NIELSEN said

      Just terrific work, Julie. If you have other material I can read, let me know where, or check in at my blog. We uncool poets have to stick together, weather these storms, keep learning and paying it forward. – Mark Nielsen, Chicago

      Reply

      • On March 14, 2014 at 1:05 pm Julie A. Eppers said

        Thank you, Mark! I will definitely check out your site. You are so right, we do need to band together… and continue to create and brighten the world with poetry.

        Reply

  • On March 12, 2014 at 9:06 am MARK NIELSEN said

    Thanks, Cam… and for all that you do, as well.
    Below… A short, strange poem written to honor and grieve PSH, in this Sacred Season of Grieving:

    https://markingtime4now.wordpress.com/2014/03/12/closed-casket-poem-for-philip-seymour-hoffman-1967-2014/

    Reply

    • On March 14, 2014 at 1:04 pm Julie A. Eppers said

      This is wonderful! Thank you for sharing this.

      Reply

  • On May 14, 2014 at 10:09 am Damion said

    Encore un post vraiment attractif

    Reply

  • On June 18, 2014 at 7:08 pm Ang said

    I wept!

    Reply

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