Tag Archives: Bob Dylan

Archives: Roger McGuinn on the Byrds

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Cameron interviews Roger McGuinn for the June, 1973 issue of Creem magazine. Topics include The Byrds, Bob Dylan, Gram Parsons and much more. Happy Sunday reading!

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Jul 14, 2013

10 Records That Affected or Changed Your Life in Some Way

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As part of a feature in the November, 1980 issue of Pro Fun magazine, Cameron was amongst a group of rock critics that shared 10 Records (or singles /artists) that in some way affected them or changed their lives. We thought it might be fun to peek back and share those with you today.

1. Everybody Knows This is Nowhere – Neil Young

2. After the Goldrush – Neil Young

3. Born To Run – Bruce Springsteen

4. Bayou Country – Creedence Clearwater Revival

5. For the Roses – Joni Mitchell

6. Something/Anything? – Todd Rundgren

7. Blood on the Tracks – Bob Dylan

8. “The Wild One, Forever” – Tom Petty

9. Cloud Nine – The Temptations

10. James Brown

 

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Jul 23, 2012

We Bought A Zoo – Complete Soundtrack

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In addition to jónsi’s score, we thought you might like to see the entire soundtrack listing for We Bought A Zoo. If the movie hasn’t arrived in your country yet, you might want to avoid if want to be surprised.

  • “Don’t Come Around Here No More” – Tom Petty
  • “Do It Clean” – Echo & The Bunnymen
  • “Airline To Heaven” – Wilco
  • “Don’t Be Shy” – Cat Stevens
  • “Go Do” – jónsi
  • “Living With The Law” – Chris Whitley
  • “Last Medicine Dance” – Mike McCready
  • “Buckets of Rain” – Bob Dylan
  • “No Soy Del Valle” – Quantic Presenta Flowering Inferno
  • “Sinking Friendships” – jónsi
  • “Like I Told You” – Acetone
  • “Ashley Collective” – Mike McCready
  • “For A Few Dollars More” – The Upsetters
  • “Hunger Strike” – Temple Of The Dog
  • “Ævin Endar” – jónsi
  • “Mariachi El Bronx” – Mariachi El Bronx
  • “Haleakala Sunset” – CKsquared
  • “Boy Lilikoi” – jónsi
  • “Cinnamon Girl” (Live) – Neil Young
  • “Holocene” – Bon Iver
  • “Throwing Arrows” – Mike McCready
  • “Work To Do” – The Isley Brothers
  • “All Your Love (I Miss Loving)” – Otis Rush
  • “I Think It’s Going To Rain Today” – Randy Newman
  • “Hoppípolla” – Sigur Rós
  • “Gathering Stories” – jónsi
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Dec 29, 2011

Inquire Within: Inspiration

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Welcome to another edition of Inquire Within… Through your submissions, Cameron will answer your questions in his own words.

Leah Greenwood (Raleigh, NC): The first time I saw it, in the theater while in college, I walked out and decided to change my major.  Almost Famous (and therefore you) are single-handedly responsible for my renewed focus on writing/English/journalism.  What movies changed you? Shaped you?  Winds up in your DVD player every month?

Cameron: Thanks Leah.  I hope you stuck with it — journalism needs you.  It’s still a living, growing and important field… whatever the format, print or blog or online.  Nothing beats the importance of details, and the discipline that comes from checking facts.  Sometimes in the immediacy of online blogging, details sadly go out the window. But truth always still reads like the truth, and if you’re in doubt, the NY Times or The New Yorker and a number of other hallowed
publications are still touchstones for the timeless kind of journalism that will always need a home.

I was changed by a bunch of films and books.  The works of journalists Seymour Hersh and Jonathan Alter are simply great, as are the absolutely gripping Robert Caro books on Lyndon Johnson.  Most recently, Bob Dylan’s reinvention as an author and even a DJ (Bob Dylan’s Theme Time Radio Hour) are big in my house.  Movie-wise, Carnal Knowledge is a timeless inspiration, along with the movies of Preston Sturges, and Wes Anderson, Jean Renoir especially Rules of the Game, Truffaut’s Day for Night, Stolen Kisses and of course, The 400 Blows.  Spike Lee’s first three films are still amazing, Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris is a reminder of a great writing and directing voice still in play… and Judd Apatow’s Knocked Up and 40 Year Old Virgin are aces for combining humor and wild surprise, and always a strong beating heart. And don’t forget Mr. Wilder and Mr. Ashby.

Please send in your questions for Cameron and maybe yours will be part of a future installment of Inquire Within…
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Dec 5, 2011

Dylan’s 70th Birthday Celebration

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That’s right. Today is Bob Dylan’s 70th Birthday. Cameron has covered Dylan over the years including this 1978 Rolling Stone piece on his Universal Amphitheatre concerts and his massive liner notes for the box set, Biograph (sorry, I still haven’t transcribed that yet..it’s a beast!).

You don’t want to miss the recent Rolling Stone issue dedicated to Bawb. It covers “The 70 Greatest Dylan Songs”, “20 Overlooked Classics”, “My Favorite Dylan Song”, Photos, Bootlegs, his first Rolling Stone interview and much more. Cameron participated by talking about #60 on the list of Greatest Dylan songs, “Buckets of Rain”. A fitting choice as I heard that song was played quite a bit on the set of We Bought a Zoo. Here’s what he wrote:

#60 – “Buckets of Rain” – Blood on the Tracks (1975)

ONE OF THE GREAT GIFTS BOB DYLAN HAS IS TO slip a grace note into an album, something that doesn’t cry out to be noticed, but is unforgettable. To me, that’s “Buckets of Rain,” the perfect grace note for Blood on the Tracks: melancholy, loping and bittersweet. It’s sly and unpretentious, but has huge power. Any room I’ve ever played it in has changed as a result.

The one little thing in the corner of an album, a movie or any piece of writing can be the most important element of all. The quiet little song makes Blood on the Tracks complete, and one of his greatest albums.

Dylan was in a middle period when he wrote it. I heard he went back to Minnesota and was living on a farm. He had a notebook, and the lyrics of Blood on the Tracks were honed in that period. He was going to get personal. It was going to hurt to hear, but it was going to be revelatory. It turned out to be the confessional Dylan album that people had been craving for a long time, and he hasn’t really gone back there since. He put up a lot of roadblocks and disinformation about it, but Blood on the Tracks is his Blue – his confessional album about relationships. I can’t think of it without “Buckets of Rain.” Dylan’s stuff continues to inform every generation – it just lives and lives, and a song like “Buckets of Rain” breathes with a simple truth about real life. After a blistering heartache comes a soothing rain.

Cameron Crowe

May, 2011

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May 24, 2011


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