Tag Archives: Exclusive

Inquire Within: Vanilla Sky Blu-ray?

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Welcome to another edition of Inquire Within… Through your submissions, Cameron will answer your questions in his own words.

Tony S.: Just wondering if there are any plans for a Blu-ray edition of Vanilla Sky?

Cameron: Thanks for the question, Tony.  The fact is that we’ve been hearing more and more about Vanilla Sky lately.  On our recent travels for We Bought A Zoo, there were a lot of questions about the movie, and a lot of passionate fans who wanted to discuss it.  It’s fueled our desire here at Vinyl Films to start planning the Blu-ray, with a new commentary track, the original ending included, and a lot more Kurt Russell, Michael Shannon, and Tilda Swinton among other elements.   I think ultimately it will come down to  Paramount hearing from the fans, so feel free to write ’em and tell ’em you’re  interested.  It feels like the time has come back around for the movie, which was certainly polarizing in the day, coming as it did right after 9/11…  but has now settled into its own psychedelic groove.  Certainly would be a joy for all of us to dive back in and pull out some of the rarities that were such a big part of the early cuts of “V Sky.”   Tech support!!

CC, TC and PC

Please send in your questions for Cameron and maybe yours will be part of a future installment of Inquire Within…
Filed under News
Mar 5, 2012

Meet The Crew: Ana Maria Quintana – Script Supervisor Part 2

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With Spielberg on the set of Munich in France

We conclude our two part interview with We Bought A Zoo Script Supervisor Ana Maria Quintana. In case you missed it, check out Part 1 here.

I bet continuity must have been a nightmare on Almost Famous, right?

It was a bit hard but I was prepared for it. As long as I had my breakdown down in my head and my notes ready, I was okay. I had to make sure I was ready to go everyday with the right information. I made sure to read the scenes the night before, went over all the notes from before and after and in between so that I was prepared. The rest of the crew was in the same wavelength so we were all out there being part of this wonderful movie with Cameron.

What was your biggest challenge working on Vanilla Sky?

Ah, now that is another story. That one was hard. Only because I was always wondering on the set, at home, working on the notes in my sleep: “Which one is it??? Is this the dream or is this reality?” “No, this is real.” “No, this is not.” It really was a film that was always working on you from inside, very deep, at least I thought so. But again, what a joy to work with Cameron and his love of words and music. And to work with Tom Cruise again. Those two are wonderful together – their friendship and wanting to make something good was intoxicating.

The challenge for me was to make sure that I was getting Cameron’s notes correctly, and that I could help in any way. Otherwise, it was a different experience marked with hard work, intensity, joy, and lots of music.

Zoo D.P. Rodrigo Prieto with Ana Maria

Was working on We Bought A Zoo as much fun as it looked?

You know, people always think that working on a film is fun, so I have to correct them by saying we are working. It is our job. It is hard work. We have to get up very early and sometimes have to work very late, even through the night. What makes a film fun for me is the project and usually when I think about it after the shooting, but not during. During the shooting I am so consumed with making sure things are right that I don’t really think about fun.

Having said that, what makes working on Cameron’s films great is that he makes you feel that you are a part of the whole project and not just doing a job. He respects and acknowledges everyone’s job on a film set. Cameron’s sets are very different,. You are all part of the process and he is incredibly accessible to everyone at all times. His care for the final product is so personal that you can’t help but be seduced. Everyday that I have worked on one of his films I have enjoyed. Hard or not, I have never once been unhappy about getting up to go to work on his set.

After four films together, tell us about your working relationship with Cameron.

I feel so proud to be able to say I have done four films with him. I am incredibly grateful for having had the opportunity to sit by his side. Warren Beatty and John Schlesinger always made me feel very proud of my job and always went out of their way to include me during the filming of their projects. Cameron has been the same for me – so giving, so open, so respectful of my craft. I admire him tremendously. He makes my job just that much more enjoyable.

Tell us something that a Script Supervisor does that people might not be aware of

We observe, we take notes, we report, we are always on, we seldom leave a set,. We sometimes play psychiatrist, mom, sister, confidante, or girlfriend. And we are the only one in our department.

Do you think that directing a feature film is still in your future?

Who knows? They say it’s never too late to start something new…who knows…it is a New Year after all, but I better hurry since the world is coming to an end…!

Special thanks to Ana Maria Quintana for her generosity and time with this interview!

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Jan 18, 2012

Meet The Crew: Ana Maria Quintana – Script Supervisor

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Cameron and Ana Maria on the set of Zoo

We are pleased to introduce you to Ana Maria Quintana, Script Supervisor on Cameron’s last four films (Almost Famous, Vanilla Sky, Elizabethtown and We Bought A Zoo). She was born and raised in Chile before moving to New York when she was fourteen years old. The family eventually headed west and Ana Maria studied film at L.A. City College. She has worked on more than 50 movies in a career that now spans more than four decades. We chat with Ana Maria in two parts about her duties as Script Supervisor, some of the many directors and films she has worked on and much more.

Tell us what a Script Supervisorʼs main duties are.

First of all and most importantly: to have total knowledge of the script. You are responsible for breaking it down in every department. Props, wardrobe, make-up, hair, set dressing, time of day, time of the year.

We time a script so that we know how long the script is and how long each scene is. This will be helpful throughout the shooting. We keep a tally to compare so that the Director and the Editor can use this to make sure that they are not running too long. If a film is meant to be 2 hours you don’t want to shoot a 4-hour film.

Once we start production, we are involved in all the rehearsals, set-ups and shooting of the film. We keep detailed notes on the shooting day, scene numbers, take numbers, camera information, lenses and filters. We describe each scene and make notes on each take.

All of our notes are given to the Editor to use for his or her assembly, and the Director will later refer to them during his or her cut. The notes will tell them the good takes from the bad, the incomplete from the complete, what each take had that was particularly good or bad, and any other notes that might help distinguish the shooting scene during the editing process.

During filming, we are responsible for all continuity of the scenes being shot. Since most films are shot out of order, it is up to the Script Supervisor to preserve the continuity at all times, in every department and for every aspect of the film. Everything from make-up, props, wardrobe, hair, time of day, and pace from one scene to another, etc. is under the scrutiny of the Script Supervisor. We must have a full understanding of all camera angles, direction, and progression. This is to make sure that camera angles and the action cuts together. We must also make sure that nothing is left out from the script, that all the shots the Director wanted and needed are completed. We cue actors during rehearsals and make all changes on the script. During the shooting, we make sure that the actors match their actions with their words, cigarettes, cups, etc. Any movement with their hands or body must match in all the angles at all times. We also prepare a production report for the Producers that shows the scenes shot, the scenes that need to be shot, the screen time shot everyday, page count and set-up count. Above all, we must always be present for the Director to make sure the script is available to them, and to make any notes that he or she might give you at a moment’s notice.

Be present, be alert, be focused, and be prepared. That is my motto.

On The Set of Blade Runner with Ridley Scott, Rutger Hauer & William Sanderson

You have a long, distinguished career working with such Directors as Ridley Scott (Blade Runner), Steven Spielberg (Jurassic Park, Minority ReportThe Adventures of Tin Tin) and James Cameron (Avatar). Tell me something you took away from working with these particular Directors.

Wow! First of all, I walk into work and walk away saying to myself: WOW WOW WOW!!!! To this day, I still cannot believe that I am standing on the set with these or any other Director. It is a privilege and an honor to have worked with all of the Directors I have during my career.

From Ridley, I learned so much from the very beginning, especially the care and incredible knowledge of design, pace, and creativity that he took to make that film. I did not know we were making Blade Runner, I just knew I was working on a film that was just beautiful to watch everyday. I was surprised and in total awe at the images that were being created… it was wonderful.

Then of course came Steven Spielberg. I started with him on Hook. I had just had my son, so going back to work was different this time around. I needed to work more than ever and I was hired. I couldn’t believe it. I never thought in a million years that I would work on a big production like that one. There I was, on the biggest set in MGM, back when it was stilled called MGM. It was the care that Steven took with every scene that was so marvelous to watch and be a part of. It was very hard work, a lot of detail and Steven had the whole film in his head. I had to somehow get in there. Thank goodness I got to do more films with him and after 18 years, I am just finally beginning to understand about 10%…can you believe that?

Steven is a very intense filmmaker; he works very fast and does not repeat himself. You must be prepared, prepared, prepared at all times for anything and everything, that is how he works. Because of his love and immense professionalism in his films, I have felt at all times that I must try and strive to keep up. I have learned so much about editing and staging of scenes from Steven. Just when I think I’ve got a handle on it, he surprises all of us. A friend of mine long ago said something about John Huston. He said that if you cut Huston’s veins, they would bleed celluloid. I think that of Steven Spielberg.

I did not do the whole film Avatar; I was only hired to do a couple of weeks of the live action part in Los Angeles. I accepted gladly since I wanted to see what this was all about. I was given a great surprise and a wonderful experience. James Cameron is just amazing –  his knowledge, his care for every little part of the frame, his passion. It was great to be able to sit and watch him work. I loved it, especially in this new world of motion capture and 3D. It is a whole new way of making films. It was good for me to come out and learn and to adapt my work to the new wave of filmmaking.

I hope and think that overall, what I have taken from these Directors and all the others that I have worked with is an amazing love, care, passion, professionalism, and love for making films.

How did you meet Cameron and get involved with Almost Famous? Did this happen due to your existing relationship with Steven Spielberg?

Yes it did. The Producer for Almost Famous was Ian Bryce, who also produced Saving Private Ryan. When Cameron was looking for a Script Supervisor, Ian put my name on the list. I went to the interview not really knowing what would happen, but I do remember seeing him for the first time and I just liked him. Cameron is just a warm, sincere, charming and overall great person. We talked for a bit and if I remember correctly, I ended up telling him some very personal things. I think that I had the right rhythm for him. Of course, you know, with Cameron everything has to do with rhythm and images. When it’s right, it’s right. Otherwise it just does not work. I was surprised, since I am Latin and my energy is more like Charo, “cuchi-cuchi!” and all. Cameron is much more refined, but thank goodness it clicked.

Working on Almost Famous saved my life. I was in a rut in my personal life and being part of that film was just the best thing that happened to me. The story, the music, the cast, the crew, everything was full of life, laughter, joy, love and of course music… all brought together by Cameron. Loved every minute of it.

I bet continuity must have been a nightmare on Almost Famous, right?

It was a bit hard but I was prepared for it. As long as I had my breakdown down in my head and my notes ready, I was okay. I had to make sure I was ready to go everyday with the right information. I made sure to read the scenes the night before, went over all the notes from before and after and in between so that I was prepared. The rest of the crew was in the same wavelength so we were all out there being part of this wonderful movie with Cameron.

What was your biggest challenge working on Vanilla Sky?

Ah, now that is another story. That one was hard. Only because I was always wondering on the set, at home, working on the notes in my sleep: “Which one is it??? Is this the dream or is this reality?” “No, this is real.” “No, this is not.” It really was a film that was always working on you from inside, very deep, at least I thought so. But again, what a joy to work with Cameron and his love of words and music. And to work with Tom Cruise again. Those two are wonderful together – their friendship and wanting to make something good was intoxicating.

The challenge for me was to make sure that I was getting Cameron’s notes correctly, and that I could help in any way. Otherwise, it was a different experience marked with hard work, intensity, joy, and lots of music.

Zoo D.P. Rodrigo Prieto with Ana Maria

Was working on We Bought A Zoo as much fun as it looked?

You know, people always think that working on a film is fun, so I have to correct them by saying we are working. It is our job. It is hard work. We have to get up very early and sometimes have to work very late, even through the night. What makes a film fun for me is the project and usually when I think about it after the shooting, but not during. During the shooting I am so consumed with making sure things are right that I don’t really think about fun.

Having said that, what makes working on Cameron’s films great is that he makes you feel that you are a part of the whole project and not just doing a job. He respects and acknowledges everyone’s job on a film set. Cameron’s sets are very different,. You are all part of the process and he is incredibly accessible to everyone at all times. His care for the final product is so personal that you can’t help but be seduced. Everyday that I have worked on one of his films I have enjoyed. Hard or not, I have never once been unhappy about getting up to go to work on his set.

After four films together, tell us about your working relationship with Cameron.

I feel so proud to be able to say I have done four films with him. I am incredibly grateful for having had the opportunity to sit by his side. Warren Beatty and John Schlesinger always made me feel very proud of my job and always went out of their way to include me during the filming of their projects. Cameron has been the same for me – so giving, so open, so respectful of my craft. I admire him tremendously. He makes my job just that much more enjoyable.

Tell us something that a Script Supervisor does that people might not be aware of

We observe, we take notes, we report, we are always on, we seldom leave a set,. We sometimes play psychiatrist, mom, sister, confidante, or girlfriend. And we are the only one in our department.

Do you think that directing a feature film is still in your future?

Who knows? They say it’s never too late to start something new…who knows…it is a New Year after all, but I better hurry since the world is coming to an end…!

© 2011 – Vinyl Films/The Uncool. All rights reserved.
Filed under News
Jan 17, 2012

The Union: HBO Debut Set For February 2nd!

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The Union will make its HBO debut on Thursday, February 2nd . This behind the scenes look at the historical collaboration between Elton John and Leon Russell will run on HBO throughout the month. To celebrate, here’s a few never before seen stills from the film.
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Jan 10, 2012

Inquire Within: Redemption

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Welcome to another edition of Inquire Within… Through your submissions, Cameron will answer your questions in his own words.

Doug Shiloh (Rockford, IL): Two of your major films Vanilla Sky and Jerry Maguire (which are favorites of mine, by the way) delve into redemption for people who were in the kingdom of greatness, one way or another. How do the new documentaries further your look into this territory (Leon Russell’s return seems to be part of this). What is it about the theme that grabs you?

Cameron: I think many of the great heroes in history, from Winston Churchill to Steve Jobs, were cast out of the kingdom of greatness.  Their life-defining work sometimes happens upon their rugged return to power.  That theme has always grabbed me.  It’s very easy to throw in the towel, but sometimes a simple refusal to give up leads to a whole new life.  This theme began for me with Brad Hamilton’s story in Fast Times at Ridgemont High.  The fast food king was able to return with a simple twist of fate… the unexpected help of the person he least expected. Spicoli.   When we first saw Fast Times on a big screen with a paying audience, it was that moment that caused people to applaud in the audience.  I never forgot that.

And it’s even a theme in Pearl Jam Twenty.  When many of their contemporaries were giving up, and giving up on the band itself, they kept going… and found the passionate audience that keeps them alive today.  Thanks for the question, Doug.

Please send in your questions for Cameron and maybe yours will be part of a future installment of Inquire Within…
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Dec 22, 2011

Meet The Crew: Clay Griffith – Production Designer

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We are pleased to present a new feature entitled Meet The Crew. A chance to meet some of the unsung “behind the scenes” heroes who help make the films. First up is We Bought A Zoo Production Designer, Clay Griffith. Clay has been working with Cameron in a variety of roles since Say Anything… We talk about his history and the monumental task of building The Rosemoor Zoo and Mee house.

Your career began by working for directors such as Jonathan Demme (Something Wild) and James L. Brooks (Broadcast News), what did you learn most from those early experiences?

My very first film experience was with Jonathan Demme on ‘Something Wild’……..I remember him saying to everyone in the Production Meeting, “Let’s talk about what we can do, not what we can’t do.”……..I was hooked on the movie making process from that moment on. It was like a lightening bolt had struck. There was nothing else in the world that I wanted to do other than to work on movies. I went to work for James L. Brooks when I first moved to Los Angeles. I was a production assistant at his film company Gracie Films. I read a lot of scripts in that Bungalow on the 20th Century Fox lot……when I wasn’t answering phones, or taking lunch orders for producers. Jim showed me about what it was to be a true writer/director. You had to immerse yourself in the story and the characters…..you had to breathe it.

I was in heaven!

As a Set Decorator on such films as Singles, Jerry Maguire, Sleepless in Seattle and Seven, what are your main duties? For those that may not know, what’s the collaboration like between Set Decorator and Production Designer?

My main duties as a Set Decorator was to help the Production Designer visualize the tone and environments of each set within the film. Visual collaboration is a very gratifying experience once you make that connection with someone. Ultimately, the Set Decorator is in charge of dressing both stage sets, and location sets with the appropriate furniture, art, light fixtures and various textiles. When I became a Production Designer, I would immediately spend large blocks of time with the Set Decorator in order to ‘synch’ up the visual roadmap of the film. I like to create a backstory for each character and location.

What were you most proud of from a set decoration standpoint on Jerry Maguire?

Wow! That is a good question…….I think the interior of Dorothy Boyd’s house was pretty great…….it felt very real to me when we finished dressing it. I had to get into the mind of a single mom and her little boy…….I must have drawn on my own childhood in some way. The SMI sports agents offices were at the opposite end of the spectrum from Dorothy’s house. The set literally took up the entire stage. It was a sea of desks and sports paraphenalia. Our goal was to make each cubicle tell us something about the person’s life who was working there….I think we succeeded in that effort.

You moved on to Art Direction on Almost Famous, what was that experience like?

It was like being shot out of a cannon! I had so much fun making that movie……..finally getting to run free with my own vision and truly collaborating with Cameron. I was actually hired as, and acted as the Production Designer on Almost Famous……but due to a few lawyers and some other choice people at the Art Directors Guild, I was not allowed to have the Production Design credit on that film. I ruffled a few feathers by making the jump from Set Decorator to Production Designer. It’s all good….I know the work on the screen was straight from my heart.

Rites of passage, baby. I cried when we finished making that movie. I did not want it to end…….and I think I was most likely exhausted.

Did you always want to be a Production Designer, or was it something that you gravitated towards once you were exposed to all of the different possible careers in the film industry?

When I got the job on Something Wild, as an assistant to the art department……I didn’t even know what an Art Department was!

Rosemoor Zoo Site Plan

As the Production Designer on Cameron’s last two films (Elizabethtown and We Bought A Zoo), what were your main responsibilities?

Every film that I have Designed for Cameron starts in a room with just the two of us and the script. We always begin the visual process of the movie talking about every character in the story….from that point on, our meetings become a running visual dialogue of artwork, photography, literature, films  and any ocular research that inspires us with the vision of our own film.

After that, it is all about finding the right locations for the project. Concurrently, I will be putting my key staff together of Art Directors, Set Decorator, Property Master, Graphic Designers, Set Designers, Lead Scenic Painter, Construction Coordinator, Lead Greensman, and Illustrators…….I know I am forgetting some positions here.

Making a film is a collaborative art form by nature. I think one of the main responsibilities in being the Production Designer for Cameron is that I am able to convey, and explain the visual tone of the film to just about everyone on the entire production.

Were you involved with Chris Baugh (Location Manager) and Lori Balton (Location Scout) on finding the location in Thousand Oaks where the Rosemoor Zoo was ultimately built?

Oh yeah. We spent a lot of time in the car together scouting just about every available ranch in the Los Angeles area.

What was the biggest challenge in designing and building the Rosemoor Zoo?

The biggest challenge in designing and building the Rosemoor Zoo……was designing and building the Rosemoor Zoo!!!!!  I was so happy once we found the Greenfield Ranch as our primary House and Zoo location……and then reality set in. Oh my God, I thought, now I actually have to pull this off! Aside from encountering a few large and disgruntled rattlesnakes, one of the biggest challenges was dealing with the constantly changing weather. We experienced winter, spring, summer and fall at that construction sight. Rain, frost and scorching heat makes it a little difficult to build a set sometimes……but my construction, paint and greens crew were absolutely up for the challenge, and they executed the build flawlessly.

Tiger Enclosure Design

Did you attempt to mirror its real life counterpart, The Dartmoor Zoo?

Yes, but only with particular animal enclosures, namely the Tiger enclosure. For the most part we tried to mirror the spirit and essence of what The Dartmoor Zoo really is.

Talk about the main objectives designing the Mee house.

The first objective was to design and build both the Mee House and the Zoo at the same time. We wanted the shooting crew to have the ability to be able to move the Zoo to the House, or the House to the Zoo whenever need be. Cameron and I agreed very early on in our meetings that the Mee House should have an inherent soul about it. Yes, it should be old and a little rundown around the edges….but someone used to love it, and that love should still be evident in the house.

 

I grew up in an old farmhouse in New York state……I immediately dove into my old family photo albums and started pulling tons of reference pictures of that farmhouse. It was a love letter to my own childhood in designing the Mee farmhouse.

An Inspiration from Clay’s Childhood Helps Build the Zoo

You seem to have a special relationship with Cameron that dates back to Say Anything… Tell us about your working relationship.

We have developed a shorthand with each other over the years. Cameron is a great communicator, and a great listener….I know that after I read the script for Say Anything… I was so overwhelmed by the dialogue and the true soul of the story, I had to meet the guy who wrote this script! Fortunately for me, I was working for James L Brooks at the time, and Cameron was in an office directly across the parking lot from Gracie Films. I got up from my desk and walked to his office and knocked on his door. I can’t even remember what the words were that came out of my mouth…..something about how amazing the Say Anything… script was, and I know it will be your first directing job, and I have some film experience already (Something WildDirty Dancing), and would you please consider me as your possible assistant on this project because I could help you out with some of the on-set stuff. It was like my voice was coming from somewhere else far away. He looked at me and said, “Well, thank you, man….I’m glad you dug it.”

Got the job about 4 months later. I guess that is my 20 seconds of courage story. Makes me smile when I think about it. I’m not sure if i answered the question….but that’s how the working relationship started.

Did you ever think you and Cameron would have this strong, long-lasting working relationship – think back to driving to set on Day One of Say Anything… – would you have ever imagined you both would be where you are now? 

Ha, Ha! I remember that day very well. When we were getting close to our exit Cameron turned to me and said, “I’ll give you Fifty dollars to keep driving down the freeway and pass that exit.”

And I replied, “No,no,no. This is the day that you will Direct your movie. You are my Director, and I am driving you to the set!”

To answer the question, I think in my heart I hoped that we would always have the relationship that we had at that very moment. Happy that we have arrived where we are now.

Last question, where did your nickname, Yeti, originate?

You sure have done your research! It is a nickname that I picked up from my sister actually. We moved to the Virgin Islands when I was around 8 years old……to make a long story short, it is derived from the local West Indian phrase, ” Yeah, you de Mahn!”…..somehow, along the way my sister fashioned her version of the phrase and applied to her unwitting brother, Yetimon….Yeti for short. It’s pretty funny when people call me that for the first time…..it’s almost like they are not sure of how to say it. Cameron had no problem adapting it to me at all.

© 2011 Vinyl Films/The Uncool. All rights reserved.

 

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Dec 20, 2011

Inquire Within: Inspiration

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Welcome to another edition of Inquire Within… Through your submissions, Cameron will answer your questions in his own words.

Leah Greenwood (Raleigh, NC): The first time I saw it, in the theater while in college, I walked out and decided to change my major.  Almost Famous (and therefore you) are single-handedly responsible for my renewed focus on writing/English/journalism.  What movies changed you? Shaped you?  Winds up in your DVD player every month?

Cameron: Thanks Leah.  I hope you stuck with it — journalism needs you.  It’s still a living, growing and important field… whatever the format, print or blog or online.  Nothing beats the importance of details, and the discipline that comes from checking facts.  Sometimes in the immediacy of online blogging, details sadly go out the window. But truth always still reads like the truth, and if you’re in doubt, the NY Times or The New Yorker and a number of other hallowed
publications are still touchstones for the timeless kind of journalism that will always need a home.

I was changed by a bunch of films and books.  The works of journalists Seymour Hersh and Jonathan Alter are simply great, as are the absolutely gripping Robert Caro books on Lyndon Johnson.  Most recently, Bob Dylan’s reinvention as an author and even a DJ (Bob Dylan’s Theme Time Radio Hour) are big in my house.  Movie-wise, Carnal Knowledge is a timeless inspiration, along with the movies of Preston Sturges, and Wes Anderson, Jean Renoir especially Rules of the Game, Truffaut’s Day for Night, Stolen Kisses and of course, The 400 Blows.  Spike Lee’s first three films are still amazing, Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris is a reminder of a great writing and directing voice still in play… and Judd Apatow’s Knocked Up and 40 Year Old Virgin are aces for combining humor and wild surprise, and always a strong beating heart. And don’t forget Mr. Wilder and Mr. Ashby.

Please send in your questions for Cameron and maybe yours will be part of a future installment of Inquire Within…
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Dec 5, 2011

Inquire Within: Writing Habits

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Welcome to another edition of Inquire Within… Through your submissions, Cameron will answer your questions in his own words.

The Uncool: Tell us about your writing habits. How often do you write?

Cameron: I write every day.  I listen to music every day.  It’s kind of like keeping a creative radio-station tuned in. Life is always sending you a new playlist and I like to write down what’s coming in.

A typical day at the office! (Not really, just the set of Vanilla Sky)

Please send in your questions for Cameron and maybe yours will be part of a future installment of Inquire Within…

 

Filed under News
Nov 21, 2011

David Crosby: Remember My Name-Out Now on DVD/Blu-ray & Digital!


  • Aloha- FX Now
  • Almost Famous- Hulu
  • E-Town- Amazon,Hulu
  • Fast Times- Starz
  • Jerry Maguire- Amazon, Showtime
  • Vanilla Sky- Starz