Tag Archives: Local Hero

20 Songs You Should Download This Month

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Cameron shares 20 movie soundtrack songs to download (before the streaming days!) from the November, 2005 issue of Blender Magazine.

20 Songs You Should Download This Month

Cameron Crowe, Director of Elizabethtown and soundtrack geek extraordinaire, selects his all-time favorite movie tunes

1.Harry Nilsson – “Jump Into The Fire” – Goodfellas (Atlantic)

A perfect Scorsese marriage of visuals and song. And, of course, a lot of blow.

 

2. Aimee Mann – “Wise Up” – Magnolia (Reprise)

One of my favorite Aimee Mann songs, used here to a worshipful degree.

3. Henry Mancini – “Moon River” – Breakfast At Tiffany’s (RCA)

Audrey Hepburn, Henry Mancini, Blake Edwards – all at their JFK-era peak.

Read the rest of this post

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Sep 25, 2017

Five Favorite Films

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Cameron shared his five favorite films (okay, six) with Rotten Tomatoes recently. Here they are in no particular order.

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Local Hero (1983)
Bill Forsyth, come back!  It’s hard enough to create a movie this deeply funny, so odd and so memorable… but to have a score like Mark Knopfler’s, too? Come on. This is the holy grail of personal filmmaking with a distinctive directorial touch. Also check out Forsyth’s other films like Comfort and Joy and Gregory’s Girl for his trademark touch: the random moment that has no reason to be in the movie, except it’s everything you think about later.

 

Quadrophenia (1979) and Control (2007)
Quadrophenia and Control. Franc Roddam and Anton Corbijn’s films both accomplish the rarest thing; they capture the feeling in the music of the bands that they’re covering. To watch these two great movies is to geek out on cinematic portraits that remind you exactly why you first fell in love with a Townshend power chord, or discovered Ian Curtis’ bleak genius. Character to look for: Steph (Leslie Ash), the scene-stealer from Quadrophenia.
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The Rules of the Game
(La Règle du jeu) (1939)
Jean Renoir puts on a master class in ensemble comedy-drama. Period.
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The Royal Tenenbaums (2002)
The Royal Tenenbaums is a mood masterpiece. Everything about Wes Anderson’s film is perfect; it immediately transports you to a world only he could create. Part Salinger, part idealized New York, but mostly Wes’ pleasantly devastating view of this family’s life, Tenenbaums succeeds on great writing and extremely particular filmmaking. Put this together with a score and a soundtrack for the ages, and you have a film that operates like the best of Hal Ashby or even a filmmaker like Miyazaki. It feels so good, it’s almost like a drug. Also, the Rolling Stones have never been used better in film history, and that’s just one of the movie’s many wonderful marriages of music and cinema. And then there’s Gene Hackman…
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The Apartment (1960)

You really can’t beat The Apartment for finding laughs and heartache and triumph in the life of a morally compromised schnook of an insurance salesman. The great Billy Wilder was at one of his many career peaks here, finding unforgettable depth in Shirley MacLaine as elevator operator Fran Kubelik, and pulling a delicious Mitt Romneyesque-bad-guy performance out of an unlikely casting choice, the Disney leading man from FlubberFred MacMurray.

The high-water mark in romantic comedy, this movie is so assured of its tone that even an attempted suicide is never far from a big laugh. It’s all wrapped up in giddy melancholy and — in a rare move — the Academy gave this comedy a whole bunch of Oscars too. Viva Wilder!

 

Courtesy of Rotten Tomatoes – January 4, 2017

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Jan 6, 2017

Stormy Night Films

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As I look outside at the grey skies and rain here in Seattle, I thought it would be a great time to revisit Cameron’s 10 Essential Films For a Stormy Night. The list was put together for the September, 2005 issue of Paste magazine. Good timing too as Quadrophenia and The Royal Tenenbaums were recently announced as coming to Criterion Blu-ray in August!

1. Local Hero (Bill Forsythe) – Because of the characters, the things they say to each other and, of course, The Rabbit.

2. Best Years of Our Lives (William Wyler) – Myrna Loy just plain rocks, and so does everybody else in the sprawling beautiful epic. In the words of Wyler’s buddy Billy Wilder, “I was crying five minutes into this picture and I did not not know why.”

3. The Apartment (Billy Wilder) – Because it’s perfect.

4. The Royal Tenenbaums (Wes Anderson) – A complete, compact, bittersweet world. And also, the music. Wes’s use of “Ruby Tuesday” is devastating, and let’s not even get started on the shot of Gwyneth Paltrow exiting that bus to Nico’s “These Days.”

5. Richard Pryor: Live in Concert (Jeff Margolis) – Pryor starts out telling jokes, and then takes a turn. “Let me tell about my year…” Modern personal comedy would never be the same.

6. Live A Little, Love A Little (Norman Taurog) – There’s a good chance that within a few months, Elvis probably didn’t even remember making this movie. He’s a slurring, amphetamined mess…of perfection. Check out the only psychedelic number he ever performed, “Edge of Reality.”

7. Hannah and Her Sisters (Woody Allen) – Like The Royal Tenenbaums, it’s a complete world you can’t help but revisit. As addictive as whatever drugs Elvis was on during the above movie, and more.

8. Quadrophenia (Franc Roddam) – Because of Steph. And, of course, Jimmy.

9. Shampoo (Hal Ashby) – A quiet, timeless look at modern man, set to musical perfection…and all the best characters are women.

10. Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir) – The inspiration for Shampoo, and so much more. The gorgeous catastrophy of the human condition and love, on full display. Misunderstood and discounted in its day, this masterpiece is rich and deep and only gets better. I’m tempted to call it the Exile on Main Street of Jean Renoir’s catalog of brilliant work, but it’s deeper and more elegant and even better than that. And the best character is the sad fool played by Renoir himself.

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May 21, 2012

Zoo Inspirations: Peter Riegert, Mark Knopfler and Local Hero

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Denis Lawson and Peter Riegert in Local Hero

You might have read that Bill Forsythe’s 1983 film Local Hero was a big inspiration for We Bought A Zoo. Not just with Mark Knopfler’s score setting the mood, but creating a world that the main character (and the audience) can get lost in. Cameron took that a step further with a few homages to the film. In Zoo, Kelly mentions that Ben is “our local hero” and one of the films stars, Peter Riegert plays Matt Damon’s boss at the beginning of the film.

Peter sat down for a chat with Reel Life with Jane and discussed working on Zoo, Local Hero and his impressive 40 year career. So head on over and read the interview and if you haven’t see Local Hero, check it out, you won’t be disappointed.

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Jan 3, 2012

Top 10 (or so) Music Moments in Film

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In June 2009, to celebrate Empire magazine’s 2oth anniversary, Cameron shared his Top 10 (Or So) Music Moments in Film. Some of his usual favorites (The Royal Tenenbaums, Live A Little, Love A Little, Harold & Maude, Heima, etc.) are here, but you’ll also find some hidden and rarely mentioned films too. Dig into his list and then share your thoughts too.

What are your favorites? Share your favorite musical moments from cinema!

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Oct 17, 2011

Inquire Within: Zoo Homework

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We are back with another edition of Inquire Within… Through your submissions, Cameron will answer your questions in his own words. The goal is to have a new question and answer posting every week or two leading up to the releases of The UnionPearl Jam Twenty and We Bought a Zoo this fall.

The Uncool: What films were required viewing this time around for your cast and crew before you started filming We Bought a Zoo?

Cameron: Local Hero and the Sigur Ros documentary Heima.  Both had a warmth and a feeling of getting lost in another world, a place you might never want to leave.  At this point, I’ve ordered so many copies of these two films, if Amazon had a button that just said — “AGAIN” — I would press it.

Fun Fact: Heima was even used on the signs to guide people to the set of We Bought a Zoo!

Please send in your questions for Cameron and maybe yours will be part of a future installment of Inquire Within…

 

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Jun 11, 2011

Cameron’s Top 10 – Empire 500 Greatest

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rulesofthegame

As a follow up to a previous post regarding Empire magazine’s “The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time”, many of you have asked what Cameron’s personal Top 10 was. There’s some expected films here, but also a few surprises (No Harold and Maude?)! So without further adieu…

  1. The Rules of the Game (Renoir)
  2. The Apartment (Wilder)
  3. Shampoo (Ashby)
  4. Tootsie (Pollack)
  5. Strangelove (Kubrick)
  6. Local Hero (Forsyth)
  7. Old Boy (Chan-Wook)
  8. Best Years of Our Lives (Wyler)
  9. Some Like It Hot (Wilder)
  10. The Royal Tenenbaums (Anderson)
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Nov 10, 2008

Mike Finger’s The Blue and the Black