Tag Archives: The Door

Archives: Black Sabbath – San Diego Door

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Black Sabbath – Circa 1972

Cameron interviews Black Sabbath’s one and only Ozzy Osbourne for this 1972 interview for the San Diego Door. Ozzy is at his talkative and entertaining best here, so do check it out.

Black Sabbath Interview

You mentioned a few minutes ago about how tedious is to be on the road for as long as Black Sabbath has. 

Yeah. And as soon as you go home, you’ve got to start thinking about the next tour, so you’re not getting any rest. It’s not that the physical work is so tiring, it’s the mental work. You’ve got new albums to think about. You got to worry about whether you’re overexposing yourself, whether you’re not doing enough. You’ve got all this bullshit to think about.

Y’know before we went on this tour, I had an infected throat. I had a very bad throat that I noticed three days before we came (to America for the tour), which wasn’t any fault of ours or our management because we were going through this big change-around in the business-side. We didn’t know whether to go on the tour or not. So we just came over anyway… I couldn’t work the first week. My throat gave out completely. This is… what… our seventh tour of America. Major tours, too. We all feel very, very tired. We’ve done seven tours in just over a year, now. We’ve worked so much in this country it’s driving me loopy.

Are you happy with the new album?

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May 18, 2014

Archives: The James Gang

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The James Gang in 1972. L to R (Jim Fox, Dale Peters, Domenic Troiano and Roy Kenner)

In 1972, Cameron sat down with (one of the many configurations) of the James Gang in this lengthy interview for the San Diego Door. There’s some interesting discussion around the music business, life without Joe Walsh (who left the band the prior year) and their recent albums, Straight Shooter and Passin’ Thru. We hope you like it!

James Gang Rides Again

Not unlike those James Brown records that constantly remind us all that he of “the hardest working man in show business,” those James Gang biographies always seem to emphasize that the James Gang is “the hardest working band in show business.”

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Apr 25, 2014

Meet the Crew: Neal Preston

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Neal Preston is one of rock’s most celebrated and iconic photographers. Neal’s relationship with Cameron nearly goes back to the beginning of his illustrious career. We chatted with Neal on location in Hawaii about his career, his new iBook Led Zeppelin: Sound and Fury and much more.

When did you first meet Cameron? I know you guys worked together at Circus magazine and Rolling Stone, but had you met earlier while he was writing for the San Diego Door or Creem?

You know, I actually don’t recall the very first time we met — but I know that around the time we met he was definitely writing for the San Diego Door. I remember my girlfriend Bobbi (who was a publicist with rock p.r. agency Gershman, Gibson and Stromberg) shoving a copy of the Door in front of me, virtually demanding that I “read this kid’s stuff!! He’s only 14 years old!!!!”

Yeah, he could write, but what was far more astounding to me was that he was a really good ping pong player.  There was a ping-pong table in the rec center where he lived.  I was 5 years older than him, yet he probably beat me 80-90% of the time.  I hated losing to him, more than he ever knew.  In fact I’m still upset about it.

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Apr 22, 2014

Journalism Archives: Carole King – Music

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Carole King – Music (Ode SP 77013)

With the release of the new Carole King album, Music, she is in the same situation The Band was in with Stage Fright, Cat Stevens is in with Teaser and the Firecat, and James Taylor was in with the release of Mud Slide Slim. When an artist becomes a superstar on the basis of one album, the follow-up LP is always compared with it’s predecessor. No matter how good the second album is, the majority of critics and buyers will criticize it as not “being as good.”

If the artist has changed his style in any way, the buyers will be disappointed. If the artist has stayed the same, the critics will pan the album and him for not evolving musically. So, Carole King can’t please everybody in Music.

Writer, her first album, was an experimental one. She switched from style to style, the result being an amateur recording with the exceptions of “Child of Mine” and “Up on the Roof,” which made it hard to believe that these were from the same album as the disasters “Spaceship Races” and “To Love.”

Tapestry, one of the most successful albums in recording history, was Carole King after she found her strength. Her jumpy piano work and the bubbling guitar of James Taylor seemed to make a combination that pleased both undergrounder and Sixteen Magazine devourers alike.

Music, however, isn’t a carbon copy of this successful style. For the new album, Miss King has employed the same group of musicians that has accompanied her throughout her previous albums: James Taylor and Danny “Kootch” Kortchmar on lead guitars, her husband, Charley Larkey, on bass, and Russ Kunkel on drums. So, what we hear on the new album is not only the musical evolvement of Carole King, but of the accompanists as well.

Eight of the album’s ten tunes were written by Miss King solely. In the past, she has collaborated with Gerry Goffin and, more recently, Toni Stern (who wrote three songs for the album), but these are the first lyrics that she has written by herself.

My favorite cut is the trivial “Brighter.” These changes are really first rate and the up-tempo arrangement couldn’t be more efficient. Although the song is obviously for the purpose of filling up the LP and achieving the quota for playing time, there is something about it that cries out for more than the skimpy 2:50 that is devoted to it.

The changes in Carole King’s style with this new album are minor. Her stuttering piano work has been replaced by a more continuous flowing sound. Her strained voice has matured in a short time to a smoother style.

The simple arrangements have grown more complex and lasting with the effective addition of more voices and guitars.

So, what more can be said? Carole King is definitely worthy of all the premature hype placed upon her by the many critics eager to unload their journalistic vocabulary of superlatives.

Courtesy of the Door (aka San Diego Door) – Cameron Crowe –  December 23, 1971  – January 12, 1972

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Dec 10, 2012

Journalism Archives: Yes – Fragile

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Yes – Fragile (Atlantic SD-7211)

For several years the group Yes has gone unnoticed in the United States, while in England their albums and performances are looked forward to with tremendous anticipation. TheirYes Album was rated along with After the Goldrush as album of the year in the Melody Maker Poll. Meanwhile back in the States they were buried behind J. Geils and Ten Years After in their American tour.

It is my sincere hope that with Fragile, Yes will achieve all the recognition they deserve.

The production work on the album is the cleanest and most original since perhaps Who’s Next. At the risk of digging up a cliché, Fragile is a complete trip from the first cut to the last. “Roundabout,” the full eight-and-a-half minute version, opens the album in grand manner. The track begins with a short classical guitar riff and slowly flows into the full arrangement of moog, harpsichord, several guitars acoustic and electric, and electric piano. The song, more appropriately, the suite, could have easily become quite pretentious, however, the knowledgeable arranger and producer molded it into a truly classic recording.

Each track takes on a different course than the previous one. The reason behind this could possibly be that five of the album’s cuts are the personal and individual ideas of Yes’s five members. More simply, each of the group members were given the chance to step out into the hypothetical spotlight and produce a cut that was completely their work and no one else’s. Keyboard man Rick Wakeman’s “Cans and Brahms” is an adaptation in which he plays electric piano taking the part of the strings, grand piano taking the part of the woodwind, organ taking the brass, electric harpsichord taking reeds, and synthesizer taking contra bassoon. “We Have Heaven” is the product of vocalist Jon Anderson in which he sings all the vocal parts. “Five Per-Cent For Nothing” is a sixteen bar tune by Bill Bruford, drummer, in which the whole harmony is the percussion line. Bassist Chris Squire’s “The Fish” has each rhythm, riff, and melody produced from the varying sounds produced by the bass guitar. “Mood For a Day” is a solo guitar piece by Steve How.

The musicianship is actually so innovative, that each of the above-described tracks is enjoyable and awesome at the same time. The remaining pieces are the product of the total group and just as excellent.

Fragile is the brand of album that many artists yearn to record as a follow-up to a previous masterpiece. And for one of the all too few times in contemporary music, an artist has actually lived up to the tremendous promise of a proceeding recording.

Courtesy of the Door (aka San Diego Door) – Cameron Crowe –  March 9, 1972  – March 30, 1972

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Nov 16, 2012

Hanging with Alice Cooper

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Alice Cooper Circa 1972 by Jim Marshall

In honor of Halloween, we thought it would be fun to take a look back at a 1972 San Diego Door interview with “Mr. Scary”, Alice Cooper. It’s a rare, joint article written alongside fellow Door writer, Art Grupe. Happy Halloween!

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Oct 31, 2012

Door Reviews: Frampton, Croce, New Riders, Black Oak & Hank Snow

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Happy Friday everyone. I’d like to share 5 mini-reviews that Cameron did for the San Diego Door. He completely dominated the Stereoscopes (i.e. review) section of the July 28, 1972 issue, so I’ll be sharing all of his reviews over three or four posts. For now, he’s pretty harsh on Black Oak Arkansas and Jim Croce, while being mixed on the latest albums from Hank Snow and New Riders of the Purple Sage. On a better note, he’s very favorable on the first solo album from some guy named Peter Frampton (who used to be the group Humble Pie). Could be the start of a beautiful friendship…

 

 

 

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Jun 24, 2011

Splinters of CSNY: Harvest, Manassas & Nash/Crosby

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In June 1972, just prior to his 15th birthday, Cameron wrote this epic review of three new albums from the members of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. At this time, this was definitely the most in-depth review that he’d done for the San Diego Door. Neil Young’s Harvest gets the bulk of the attention and you can feel Cameron’s disappointment as you read his review. It’s very clear that Cameron prefers the “stripped down-acoustic” versions of these Harvest songs that Young had previously debuted on tour. Stephen Stills’ Manassas doesn’t fare too well either, but Cameron really enjoyed the Crosby contributions on the Nash/Crosby LP quite a bit.

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Jun 19, 2011

David Crosby: Remember My Name Coming Soon!


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